Ph.D. in Japanese, Linguistics Subplan

The Ph.D. program in Japanese, Linguistics subplan is designed to prepare students for a doctoral degree in Japanese linguistics.

Students should consult the most up-to-date version of the degree plan on the Stanford Bulletin as well as the EALC Graduate Handbook. Each student should meet with their faculty advisor at least once per quarter to discuss the degree requirements and their progress.

Applicants must have a minimum of three years of Japanese language study at Stanford or the equivalent to be considered for admission. Ph.D. students complete M.A. requirements on the way to advancing to Ph.D. candidacy. The majority of required course work for Ph.D. students demands the ability to read primary and secondary materials in Japanese. Advanced standing may be considered for students entering the Ph.D. program who have already completed an M.A. in Japanese literature or linguistics elsewhere only in cases when the level of prior course work and research is deemed equivalent to departmental requirements for the Ph.D.  All courses must be taken for a letter grade. Prior to advancing to terminal graduate registration (TGR) status, graduate students must complete all requirements except passing the University Oral Exam (i.e., dissertation defense) and submitting the final dissertation.

To declare the Linguistics track, use the Declaration or Change to a Field of Study eForm.

Before advancing to Terminal Graduate Registration (TGR) status, students must complete all degree requirements below except pass the University oral examination and submit the final dissertation.
 

Please refer to the Stanford Bulletin for full Japanese Linguistics PhD requirements.
Degree Requirements for the Ph.D. in Japanese, Linguistics Subplan

Admission to Candidacy

Candidacy is the most important University milestone on the way to the Ph.D. degree. Admission to candidacy rests both on the fulfillment of department requirements and on an assessment by department faculty that the student has the potential to successfully complete the Ph.D.

Following University policy (GAP 4.6.1), students are expected to complete the candidacy requirements by Spring Quarter of the second year of graduate study.

Degree Requirements

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in both modern and classical Japanese by completing the following courses, or by demonstrating an equivalent level or linguistic attainment by passing the appropriate certifying examinations:
    • Fourth-Year Japanese (take the entire sequence through to the following):
      • JAPANLNG 213 - Fourth-Year Japanese, Third Quarter (2-4 units)
    • Classical Japanese (take both of the following):
      • JAPAN 264 - Introduction to Premodern Japanese (3-5 units)
      • JAPAN 265 - Readings in Premodern Japanese (2-5 units)
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in at least one supporting language, to be chosen in consultation with the primary advisor according to the candidate's specific research goals. For the second language, students must be proficient at the second-year level, at the minimum; a higher level of proficiency may be required depending on the recommendation of the student's advisor(s). Reading proficiency must be certified through a written examination or an appropriate amount of course work, to be determined on a case-by-case basis. When deemed necessary by the student's advisor(s), working knowledge of a third language may also be required.
  3. Complete six advisor-approved courses numbered above 200 from among the offerings of the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. At least one of these six courses must be an advanced seminar numbered above 300. At least one of these six courses must deal with Japanese literature.
  4. Complete five upper-division or graduate-level courses in linguistics and other supporting fields. To be determined in consultation with the student's primary advisor, these may include applied linguistics, Chinese linguistics, psychology, education, anthropology, or sociology.
  5. Complete JAPAN 279 - Research in Japanese Linguistics (2-5 units); this course should be taken in the first or second year at Stanford.
  6. Submit two qualifying papers (QPs) that present each student’s original research in two different subfields of linguistics discussing Japanese linguistic topics and data. The length of the paper depends on the topic but generally should be about 25-30 pages. It is important, however, that the paper is not evaluated by its length but by its quality. It should contain a clear statement of the issue in question, the motivation for the inquiry in relation to the existing body of work, cogent arguments supported by compelling analyses of relevant data and theoretical implications of the findings. The quality is expected to be equivalent to a paper accepted for presentation at a professional conference and/or publishable in conference proceedings or in a journal in linguistics. A QP can be an extension of a term paper, but its topic should be discussed with the student’s advisor prior to writing. It is strongly recommended that the student should seek at least two faculty members to be on the QP committee who will provide guidance for research and writing in the process, and who will evaluate the paper. If circumstances do not permit obtaining multiple members, consult the advisor. Students are encouraged to start planning and consulting advising faculty members early in the second year. The first qualifying paper (QP1) should be approved by winter quarter of the third year. To obtain approval of QP1 in time, a completed draft should be provided to the committee members at the beginning of autumn quarter, if not earlier. The second qualifying paper (QP2) should be approved by the winter quarter of the fourth year. To obtain approval of QP2 in time, a completed draft should be provided to the committee members at the beginning of autumn quarter, if not earlier. Failure to receive approval for QPs in time may lead to dismissal from the program. These relatively late dates for approval are given in case the full-year TA duties during the second year may affect students’ writing progress. Students are urged to start planning for QPs and complete their QP requirements as early as possible to maximize the time to prepare their dissertation proposals and their dissertations.
  7. Submit a dissertation proposal (10-15 pages) accompanied by an annotated bibliography pertaining to the topic of the dissertation and have it approved by the dissertation reading committee after an oral presentation. A proposal should specify the theoretical and empirical significance of the proposed topic of inquiry situated in the existing scholarship, the relevant data (or plans for data collection), the theoretical approach, methods of inquiry and hypotheses. It should present a planned timeline for completing the dissertation. The annotated bibliography is cumulative and should include, but would not be limited to, the references given in the dissertation proposal. The annotation can be a paragraph (or more, if needed) for each reference. This process should be completed by the spring quarter of the fourth year before TGR.
  8. Demonstrate pedagogical proficiency by serving as a teaching assistant for a minimum of one quarter and taking DLCL 301 - The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages (3 units).
  9. Pass the University oral examination. The candidate is examined on questions related to the dissertation after acceptable parts of it have been completed in draft form.

  10. Submit a dissertation demonstrating ability to undertake original research based on primary and secondary materials in Japanese.

Japanese Linguistics Ph.D. QPs in lieu of Comprehensive Exam

Submit two qualifying papers (QPs) that present each student’s original research in two different subfields of linguistics discussing Japanese linguistic topics and data. The length of the paper depends on the topic but generally should be about 25-30 pages. It is important, however, that the paper is not evaluated by its length but by its quality. It should contain a clear statement of the issue in question, the motivation for the inquiry in relation to the existing body of work, cogent arguments supported by compelling analyses of relevant data and theoretical implications of the findings. The quality is expected to be equivalent to a paper accepted for presentation at a professional conference and/or publishable in conference proceedings or in a journal in linguistics. A QP can be an extension of a term paper, but its topic should be discussed with the student’s advisor prior to writing. It is strongly recommended that the student should seek at least two faculty members to be on the QP committee who will provide guidance for research and writing in the process, and who will evaluate the paper. If circumstances do not permit obtaining multiple members, consult the advisor. Students are encouraged to start planning and consulting advising faculty members early in the second year.

The first qualifying paper (QP1) should be approved by Winter quarter of the third year. To obtain approval of QP1 in time, a completed draft should be provided to the committee members at the beginning of Autumn quarter, if not earlier.

The second qualifying paper (QP2) should be approved by the Winter Quarter of the fourth year. To obtain approval of QP2 in time, a completed draft should be provided to the committee members at the beginning of Autumn quarter, if not earlier.

Failure to receive approval for QPs in time may lead to dismissal from the program. These relatively late dates for approval are given in case the full-year TA duties during the second year may affect students’ writing progress. Students are urged to start planning for QPs and complete their QP requirements as early as possible to maximize the time to prepare their dissertation proposals and their dissertations.